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The 45 listed historical sites of North Mymms

Mystery still surrounds the one that's missing


Moffats Farm Farmhouse a Grade II listed building Image by the North Mymms History Project released under Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0
Moffats Farm Farmhouse is a Grade II listed building
Image by the North Mymms History Project released under Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0

Many will pass some of the 45 listed sites in North Mymms every day without realising that these protected properties and landmarks are now a preserved part of the nation's history.  Some travelling by train or road probably pass two hidden in the undergrowth and bushes. The North Mymms History Project has used data, compiled by Historic England, to create an interactive map (embedded later in this piece) of all the listed sites in the parish.

Church Cottage,  a Grade II listed building bordering St Mary's Church, North Mymms Image by the North Mymms History Project released under Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0
Church Cottage,  a Grade II listed building bordering St Mary's Church, North Mymms
Image by the North Mymms History Project released under Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0

Those commuting to London by train will pass one listed site twice a day, but might have not spotted it. It's the duty stone at Hawkshead on the east side of the railway line at the top of the golf course (Grid Ref: TL243027). Look to your left as you pass under the Hawkshead Lane bridge heading south.


Photograph of The Duty Stone at Hawkshead. Many travelling by train will pass this listed site daily Image by the North Mymms History Project released under Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0
The Duty Stone at Hawkshead (Grid Ref: TL243027)
Image by the North Mymms History Project released under Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0

Detail from the base of the Duty Stone at Hawkshead Image by the North Mymms History Project released under Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0
Detail from the base of the Duty Stone at Hawkshead (Grid Ref: TL243027)
Image by the North Mymms History Project released under Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0


The mystery of the missing coal post


But there is one listed item missing. A London coal duty marker used to stand at the junction of Hawkshead Lane and Warrengate Lane, but it disappeared in the 1980s. The marker can just be seen in the image below if you look for a small white post to the middle left of the image.


Photograph of old cottage at the south end of Warren Gate 1900s Image from G. Knott and part of the Peter Miller Collection
Old cottage at the south end of Warren Gate 1900s. The coal post can be seen middle left
Image from G. Knott and part of the Peter Miller Collection

According to Historic England the missing coal post will remain listed in case it's eventually found and restored to its original position.

A spokesperson told this site that objects such as coal duty markers, boundary stones, mileposts, and even telephone boxes are often victims of theft as they are relatively portable and sometimes turn up in scrap yards, in private collections, or on eBay.

The Warrengate Road coal post photographed in 1972
Image by Martin Nail released under Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 2.0 UK

The image above is currently the last known photograph of the Warrengate Road coal post. It was taken in 1972 by historian Martin Nail. Martin runs a site which maps all the coal posts around London. The missing Hertfordshire post is item number 32 in the list.

There are three more listed coal posts in North Mymms. They are all in Little Heath on Church Road, Hatfield Road, and Heath Road. This site has a feature about the coal posts of south Hertfordshire.


One of the three listed Little Heath Coal Posts, this one on Hatfield Road close to Church Road Image by the North Mymms History Project released under Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0
One of the three listed Little Heath Coal Posts, this one on Hatfield Road close to Church Road
Image by the North Mymms History Project released under Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0

Overgrown tomb


There are four listed tombs in the churchyard at St Mary's Church, North Mymms. One was repaired in 2018, two appear to be in good condition, but one is covered in ivy and is in need of attention.


Photograph of The overgrown Grade II listed tomb at St Mary's Church, North Mymms  Image by the North Mymms History Project released under Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0
The overgrown Grade II listed tomb at St Mary's Church, North Mymms - August 2018
Image by the North Mymms History Project released under Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0

Interactive map


You can use our interactive map below to find out more about the historic sites listed in North Mymms. Just click on the icon to read more, then click on the images to see a larger version. You will notice two shaded areas. The large green area marks the parish of North Mymms. The orange shaded area is Gobions, a space on the register of parks and gardens.

This site is grateful to Historic England for making the data available.

The map is a work in progress. The North Mymms History Project team is continuing to update the information contained on the map, including details of the sites and adding old and new images to the entries.




Comments and research welcome


As always please feel free to add any comments or information at the foot of this piece. The North Mymms History Project is meant to be a collaborative community effort to record as much of the area's past as possible. So if you have anything to add, please do so by using the form below. All contributions are pre-moderated so there will be a slight delay before your comments are published. Thanks


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